Montenegro facts and figures

Montenegro

The use of the name Montenegro began in the 15th century when the Crnojevic dynasty began to rule the Serbian principality of Zeta over subsequent centuries Montenegro was able to maintain its independence from the Ottoman Empire. From the 16th to 19th centuries, Montenegro became a theocracy ruled by a series of bishop princes in 1852, it was transformed into a secular principality. After World War I, Montenegro was absorbed by the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, which became the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929 at the conclusion of World War II, it became a constituent republic of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. When the latter dissolved in 1992, Montenegro federated with Serbia, first as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and, after 2003, in a looser union of Serbia and Montenegro. In May 2006, Montenegro invoked its right under the Constitutional Charter of Serbia and Montenegro to hold a referendum on independence from the state union. The vote for severing ties with Serbia exceeded 55% – the threshold set by the EU – allowing Montenegro to formally declare its independence on 3 June 2006.

Location:

Southeastern Europe, between the Adriatic Sea and Serbia

Area:

total: 13,812 sq km

water: 360 sq km

land: 13,452 sq km

Land boundaries:

total: 625 km
border countries: Albania 172 km, Bosnia and Herzegovina 225 km, Croatia 25 km, Kosovo 79 km, Serbia 124 km

Climate:

Mediterranean climate, hot dry summers and autumns and relatively cold winters with heavy snowfalls inland

Terrain:

highly indented coastline with narrow coastal plain backed by rugged high limestone mountains and plateaus

Land use:

arable land: 13.7%

permanent crops: 1%

other: 85.3%

 

Population:

657,394 (July 2012 est.)

Nationality:

noun: Montenegrin(s)

adjective: Montenegrin

Languages:

Serbian 63.6%, Montenegrin (official) 22%, Bosnian 5.5%, Albanian 5.3%, unspecified (includes Croatian) 3.7% (2003 census)